Sep 7, 2013; College Station, TX, USA; Texas A

2014 NFL Draft Big Board Breakdown: Quarterbacks


Oct 5, 2013; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Louisville Cardinals quarterback Teddy Bridgewater (5) along the sidelines during the fourth quarter against the Temple Owls at Lincoln Financial Field. Louisville defeated Temple 30-7. Mandatory Credit: Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

Oct 5, 2013; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Louisville Cardinals quarterback Teddy Bridgewater (5) along the sidelines during the fourth quarter against the Temple Owls at Lincoln Financial Field. Louisville defeated Temple 30-7. Mandatory Credit: Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

The 2014 NFL Draft is deemed as one of the deepest quarterback drafts in the history of the NFL. Though there are no “Andrew Luck” type prospects, the draft will be full of NFL ready quarterbacks ready to become “franchise guys”. Leading the pack is Louisville’s Teddy Bridgewater, who, last year, was deemed my most draft enthusiast to be the best quarterback in the draft. After Bridgewater how ever, there are four or five guys competing for the second spot and this is just the beginning because I predict that the ongoing debate about who is truly the second best in this class wont end until May 8th.

Without further adieu, here are the top four quarterbacks on my 2014 Quarterback Big Board.

1. Teddy Bridgewater: Bridgewater will most likely be the first quarterback taken in the 2014 NFL Draft and he may even go first overall. Bridgewater has great touch, but he can also hurl the ball down field. He is sneaky fast, but he uses his speed, primarily, to keep plays alive. Bridgewater also shows great leadership and control on the field and he’s ready to become the leader of an NFL franchise.

2. Marcus Martiota: It’s no secret, Marcus Mariota is fast and the biggest misconception about Mariota is that he is a scrambling quarterback. Maritota can do it all. He can sling the ball down the field, he’s very accurate and, nine times out of ten, he makes the right decision. The problem I have with Mariota is his scheme fit. Unless he’s drafted by the Eagles, Mariota will have to go from an up-tempo spread to a conventional NFL offense and it is unknown if he can make that jump. Personally, I think he can, but it is definitely a concern.

3. Brett Hundley: When I think about Brett Hundley, I think back a young Donovan McNabb. I know I’m not the only one to say this, but it’s the perfect comparison. Hundley, like Bridgewater, is sneaky fast and moves in the pocket very well and he has nice touch. I question his arm strength because some times the ball wobbles when he tries to throw a ball more than 30 yards. Just like McNabb, Hundley is inconsistent, but I believe Hundley has the biggest upside in this class, which makes him a very sexy prospect.

4. Tajh Boyd: Tajh Boyd is a fantastic leader and, over the last few years, he has come up big for Clemson, i.e. against LSU and Georgia. Boyd

Aug 31, 2013; Clemson, SC, USA; Clemson Tigers quarterback Tajh Boyd (10) looks to pass the ball during the second quarter against the Georgia Bulldogs at Clemson Memorial Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

Aug 31, 2013; Clemson, SC, USA; Clemson Tigers quarterback Tajh Boyd (10) looks to pass the ball during the second quarter against the Georgia Bulldogs at Clemson Memorial Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

has good speed and a cannon for an arm, but he struggles from time to time with his accuracy. Boyd reminds me of Russell Wilson. Both Boyd and Wilson are/were question because of their size, but both have great character and heart they’re both very determined athletes. I think if Boyd can land with a good coach, who will bring him along like Pete Carroll did with Wilson, Boyd can succeed at the next level.

5. Johnny Manziel: Before the summer of 2013, Manziel, despite his size, was a fairly “sexy” NFL prospect, but after his many poor decisions, Manziel’s stock is now being questioned. Manziel doesn’t have a cannon, but he can move the ball down the field. What Manziel does the best is anticipate. Manziel doesn’t wait for his receivers to get open before he throws the ball, he throws the ball into windows because he is very good at anticipating routes. The biggest question about Manziel is his size, which encompasses more than just his height because Russell Wilson has proved that you don’t have to 6′ 3″ to play in the NFL. The difference between Wilson and Manziel is that Wilson is built like an ox, while Manziel isn’t as “built” and scouts question if he can hold up. Manziel has the “it factor” and the swagger it takes to be successful at the next level, he just needs to get his act together.

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Tags: 2014 Nfl Draft Brett Hundley Johnny Manziel Marcus Mariota NFL Draft Big Board Tajh Boyd Teddy Bridgewater

  • spiderpaz

    let’s not use the word “sexy” to analyze QB prospects in the future … okay?